Thursday, September 22, 2016

Padre Pio was not a rigid Traditionalist

There is a wonderful meditation composed by Padre Pio in which he states: “He [Jesus] sees the sacrileges with which priests and faithful defile themselves, not caring about those sacraments instituted for our salvation as necessary means for it -  now, instead, made an occasion of sin and damnation of souls.” From this it can be seen that Padre Pio viewed the sacraments as the “necessary means” of salvation. However, in studying the course of his life and ministry as a Catholic priest, evidence can be found that he understood the sacraments as necessary for all in general, but not for all in particular. Thus, while he believed that the sacraments of the Church are necessary as the normative means of salvation, Padre Pio was willing to admit of exceptions on an individual basis. But these exceptions did not compromise his conviction that the one true Church founded by Jesus Christ is the Roman Catholic Church.

The following documented cases are presented as evidence that Padre Pio believed that non-Catholics could be saved and even receive the sacraments.

Adelaide McAlpin Pyle, a Baptized Protestant
She will be saved because she has faith.”

Most of the information for this first account comes from the English version of the book Mary Pyle, by Bonaventura Massa. This work was diligently compiled from written documents and taped oral testimonies, kept on file in the archives of Padre Pio’s friary in anticipation of the process for Miss Pyle’s Cause for Beatification.

The wealthy Presbyterian, Adelaide McAlpin Pyle, was the mother of Mary Pyle, a well-known convert to Catholicism who renounced her family fortune in order to spend her life near Padre Pio. The Pyle family was related by marriage to the Rockefellers, and made their fortune in the soap and hotel business. After Adelaide found out that her daughter Mary had chosen to move to southern Italy to learn about God from a saint, curiosity impelled her to travel from her plush New York townhouse to medieval San Giovanni Rotondo, in order to meet this holy man.

In spite of an unpleasant initial encounter, Adelaide eventually became quite friendly with Padre Pio. She made numerous journeys from America, beginning in the mid-1920s, to visit her daughter Mary, and to meet with the Padre. Mary often tried to convince her mother to convert to Catholicism as she herself had done, but Adelaide reportedly said in Padre Pio’s presence, “I would rather allow myself to be burned alive for my religion!” Padre Pio advised Mary not to push her mother to convert: “Let her be! Don’t upset her peace.”  However, Mary continued to worry because her mother was not a Catholic, and Padre Pio counseled, “Let’s not confuse her. She will be saved because she has faith.”

In 1936, Adelaide, who had grown older and was nearing death, made one last trip to San Giovanni Rotondo. As she said good-bye to Padre Pio at the end of this visit, the saintly priest pointed heavenward, saying to the Protestant Adelaide, “I hope we will see each other again soon, but if we don’t see each other here, we will see each other up there.”  She passed away in the fall of 1937 at the age of seventy-seven.  Her daughter Mary then became pre-occupied about her mother’s salvation. After dreaming that her mother was in Rome standing in front of the Vatican, she poured out her anxiety to Padre Pio. He replied, "And who told you that your mother could not be saved?”  

Did Padre Pio receive a revelation that Adelaide Pyle had secretly ‘in pectore” converted to the Catholic Faith? If that were true, he most certainly would have told this to her daughter Mary, who was obviously distraught from worrying over her mother’s salvation. Further, it seems likely that if Adelaide had converted, she would have shared this good news with her convert daughter. It is reasonable to conclude then that Padre Pio believed that this particular person who died outside the Church could be saved. In addition, there is evidence that Padre Pio would have been willing to hear Adelaide’s confession, and grant her sacramental absolution. On one occasion, she had confided to her daughter her great desire to kneel before Padre Pio in his confessional, but she lamented that her inability to speak Italian made this impossible. When Padre Pio heard of this, (apparently it was after her death), he bemoaned, “Oh! If she had only done it! As for the language, I would have taken care of that!”

King George V of England, a Baptized Protestant
Let us pray for a soul . . .”

One evening in 1936 Padre Pio was conversing with some dear friends in his cell. Among those present were Dr. Guglielmo Sanguinetti and Angelo Lupi, who would respectively become the medical director and the builder of Padre Pio’s hospital years later. In the middle of their conversation, Padre Pio suddenly interrupted the discourse with the words, “Let us pray for a soul soon to appear before the tribunal of God.” With that he bowed his head, and his guests, although astonished, kneeled and joined him in prayer. When they had finished, Padre Pio announced that they had been praying for the king of England. The next morning, the news blared forth on the friary radio of the unexpected death of King George V of England the previous evening. Two of the sources for this story report that Padre Aurelio was also present in the room, while another source states that Padre Pio went to the friary cell of Padre Aurelio at midnight that evening and asked him to join him in prayers for the king of England who “at that moment” was to appear before God. 

An Anglican and the son of the future King Edward VII, George was baptized on July 7, 1865 in the private chapel of Windsor Castle. Upon accession to the throne in 1910, the new king swore the following required oath: "I, N., do solemnly and sincerely in the presence of God, profess, testify and declare that I am a faithful Protestant, and that I will, according to the true intent of the enactments to secure the Protestant Succession to the Throne of my realm, uphold and maintain such enactments to the best of my power." 

In all likelihood, the king was in his final agony or had already died when Padre Pio requested prayers for him, since he was “at that moment” to appear before God. If he believed that the soul of this Protestant were doomed to the everlasting fire, why would he pray for him, and also ask others including another priest to do likewise, other than to ask for his conversion? However, it is not recorded or implied that he asked his confreres to pray for the deathbed conversion of the king – an important intention that Padre Pio in all likelihood would have explicitly stated, if such were his purpose. Although he mentioned the king to his priest colleague, he did not tell the friends in his room that they were praying for a non-Catholic until they had finished their prayers. One cannot therefore say that it is to be assumed that as Catholics they were praying for the king’s conversion.

Since as far as is known they were not specifically asked to pray for his deathbed conversion, there are two alternatives. The first is that they were simply praying for the salvation of a Protestant whom Padre Pio did not consider doomed because of his non-Catholic religion. Of course this scenario would not be acceptable to one who holds that Padre Pio subscribed to a literal extra ecclesiam nulla salus position. Those who hold that position are left with the unlikely alternative that they were praying for a Catholic, and that Padre Pio had requested the prayers because he was given a private revelation that King George V of England was secretly a Roman Catholic, loyal to the Pope!

Julius Fine, an Unbaptized Devout Jew
Julius Fine is saved . . .”

Fr. Alessio Parente, O.F.M. Cap., lived and worked alongside Padre Pio for many years in Our Lady of Grace Friary at San Giovanni Rotondo. He wrote numerous books about his confrere, and his works provide reliable source material for the saint. The following information is from Fr. Alessio’s book The Holy Souls,  and was related by a “very good friend” of his, Mrs. Florence Fine Ehrman, the daughter of the person in question.

In 1965 her father, Julius Fine, who had practiced the Jewish faith all his life and believed firmly in God, was stricken with what is commonly called “Lou Gehrig’s disease.” Mrs. Ehrman wrote to Padre Pio beseeching a cure for her father from this fatal illness. A short time later she received the reply that Padre Pio would pray for her father and would take him under his protection.

When her father passed away in February of the next year, she was able to accept his death peacefully. However after some time, she began to worry about whether or not he was saved, even though he had been a very loving and kind husband and father. “This fear came about because I began to hear many people, Protestants and Catholics alike, say that unless person had been baptized they could not be saved.”

On a visit to the friary at San Giovanni Rotondo in the fall of 1967, she was told by a personal friend (quite possibly Fr. Alessio himself) to write down whatever she wished to ask Padre Pio, and this friend would present the letter to him. She of course wrote down her concerns about the eternal state of her father’s soul – this good and gentle Jewish man who had never been baptized. The reply from Padre Pio, which she received in writing, was this: “Julius Fine is saved, but it is necessary to pray much for him.” Her mind was put at ease by such a “sure and definite” statement,” since she understood that her father was in Purgatory, his salvation guaranteed.

Whether Padre Pio was enlightened by his Guardian Angel, the Holy Spirit, interior locution, or some other means is not known. What is known, however, is his ability to make such determinations after intense prayer, nourished by his mystical union with Christ during his Mass and Holy Communion, and by the offering up of his sufferings, especially the painful bloody wounds of his stigmata. In this instance, Padre Pio committed himself to assuring a grieving daughter that her father, who was not baptized, and was not a Roman Catholic, was saved. As in the case of King George V, someone who wishes to force Padre Pio into the strict “absolutely no salvation outside the Church” camp, is only left with this improbable scenario: it was revealed to Padre Pio that the devout Jew, Julius Fine, was secretly a baptized Roman Catholic!


Padre Pio a True Catholic

From the above examples it appears that Padre Pio did not blindly adhere to the proposition that only baptized Catholics can be saved. Yet, it would be difficult to find someone more committed to the Catholic Church throughout his life than was Padre Pio. His obedience to the hierarchy was legendary, and he humbly submitted to Vatican-authorized suppression and even persecution without resistance. The spirituality of his epistles astonished even Carmelites, and his writings and teachings, born of the school of suffering, are the basis of an effort to make him a Doctor of the Church.

Padre Pio lived by the Spirit of God, not by the letter of the law, except when his superiors in religion routinely commanded obedience of him. His ingenuous openness to the plenitude of God’s mercy anticipated the explicit declarations of the Church during and after the Second Vatican Council on the possibility that non-Catholic churches can be a “means of salvation,”  and on the reception by non-Catholics of the sacraments in certain cases. Padre Pio actually believed that the gospel of Jesus Christ was Good News!

Posted 9/22/16, the eve of Padre Pio's feast day.

Much of this article was featured in the December 2006 edition of “Christian Order.” A formal footnoted version comprises one of the chapters in my book The Truth about Padre Pio's Stigmata.

View all of my books.


11 comments:

  1. Why is it that priest's become angry when lay Catholics committ mortal sin repeatedly yet will pray for and allow non catholics to not practice the holy Catholic faith their entire lives?
    It is a very confusing subject.

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  2. Personally I think BOD/BOB has potential to drive people away from traditional Catholicism.
    Its akin to "do as I say,not as I do."
    Our priest will refuse Sacraments to people if they keep committing the same mortal sins repeatedly.
    Simultaneously,he will go on & on about Baptism of desire and how non-catholics can and will enter heaven.
    Why are catholics held to such a different standard?Why can non-catholics reject Jesus Christ and the Roman Catholic faith,sin freely,and reap Paradise?
    I am looking for answers and this isn't meant to be sarcastic or insulting.

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    1. Here is an attempt to answer your questions. Catholics are held to a different standard because we are part of the true Church that Jesus founded. The Church is the body of Christ and Jesus is the head of that body. Jesus will not reject someone that loves Him or believes and trusts in Him.

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    2. Catholics held to a higher standard: "Much will be required of the person entrusted with much, and still more will be demanded of the person entrusted with more." Luke 12:48

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    3. Which one of your books has these cases documented or explained? I mean the ones that you have in this post. Thank you

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    4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    5. Hello and thank you. My book that has all of the required references for this blog article is "The Truth about Padre Pio's Stigmata", which has 22 footnotes. The below deleted comment asked essentially the same question.

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  3. I thought we would be responsible for what we know. Protestants would know what Jesus said about having to do works, though with love and it would not bring salvific grace on its own. Pharasaical fundies that point fingers at Catholics would probably be more responsible. If any Protestant would be saved, probably through extraordinary grace, I would think it would be one like Fred Rogers. I don't buy invincible ignorance. If you violate natural law and you aren't repentent, it wouldn't matter that you don't know Church teaching and/or the Bible. I am hard on myself, so I hold myself responsible for sins based on what I know, and expect others to have the same responsibility. That being said, God can save who He wants by extraordinary means, but no one should presume it upon themselves and do others a disservice by presuming it upon others.

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  4. I have recently pondered the regular flow of NDE accounts involving non-Catholics. Many of these feature a loving encounter between the individual and Christ. The individual returns to life and continues as a committed lover of Christ -- but almost never as a Catholic convert. We see the same phenomenon among Muslim converts who often report miraculous encounters with Christ. I have concluded, at least provisionally, that as Mr. Rega suggests, the bar is indeed higher for Catholics -- and that Catholics have a duty to proselytize (ouch!) non-Catholics. We will be held accountable for this dereliction. After death we may find ourselves in the anomalous position of looking up from some deep level of purgatory at Protestants in heaven who say to us, "Why did you not share with us the fullness of the Truth?"

    As a Jewish convert, I have taken immeasurable comfort in your account of the Jewish man who was saved, according to the saint. I have also taken comfort in Padre Pio's statement made to John McCaffery that the former's grandfather was in heaven based in part on prayers offered for him subsequently by Padre Pio. Putting those two things together, I continue to pray for the salvation of my deceased, unbaptized Jewish father.

    Finally, I pray regularly that all souls, at the moment of death, will receive the grace of conversion, the ability to respond to Christ's three-fold call to the soul, as reported by St. Faustina and echoed by Maria Simma.

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    1. Thank you for this thoughtful comment. I pray for my Jewish friends both living and dead. They were and are good people who wouldn't hurt a fly. And, even though I have taken heat for it, I pray for the souls of the aborted babies.

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